Zero Squared #29: Shooting the Moon

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Brian Willems is Assistant Professor at the University of Split, Croatia, where he teaches literature at the Faculty of Philosophy and film theory at the Arts Academy and his book Shooting the Moon was published in May this year from Zero Books.

Laurence A Rickels, author of Germany: A Science Fiction, blurbed the book this way

Shooting the Moon shows how our most abiding object or objective on reality’s horizon was overshot and displaced by the other reality of realization of our wish fantasies. When we ask for the moon we travel a jump cut from an idealized past to a future of wish fulfillment lying deep inside the film medium and its ongoing history.

In this episode you’ll hear a clip from Futurama, Slavoj Zizek explaining a bottle of tea, Chris “Isto” White singing the jazz standard “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” The Evolution Control Committee’s “The Fucking Moon,” a clip from the auralgraphic entertainment “Dreamies” by Bill Holt, Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner performing in “The First Men in the Moon,” Doctor Who and the Monolith reversing the polarity of the neutron flow, Negativland, and in tribute to Don Joyce, one of “Crosley Bendix’s” Arts Reviews.

Zero Squared #28: Imaginary Games

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Chris Bateman is a game designer, outsider philosopher and author. His book Imaginary Games was published by Zero Books in 2011. Bateman is also the blogger behind Only a Game and he posts regularly in between writing how to manuals on game design and lecturing at the University of Bolton.

Jon Cogburn, Director of Philosophy at LSU blurbed Imaginary Games this way:

Chris Bateman’s Imaginary Games may just do for videogames what Noël Carroll’s The Philosophy of Horror did for scary books and movies…. not only philosophically compelling and interesting; it is also a great read.

In this episode you’ll hear a rerun of a conversation about the movie Tron between me and my then thirteen year old son Ben, theme music from Super Smash Brothers Melee, Chad African explaining Zizek and his idea of ontological incompleteness, clips from a youtube documentary about smash, a short clip on Hegel from the 8-bit philosophy series, and the theme music from Super Mario Brothers.

15 Jul 2015, 5:40pm
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Zero Squared #27: Writing Through Time

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Rudy Rucker is the guest this week and we discuss his recently published book Journals 1990-2014. Rudy Rucker is a writer and a mathematician who spent 20 years as a Silicon Valley computer scientist. He’s a contemporary master of science-fiction, and received the Philip K. Dick award twice. His 37 published books include novels and non-fiction books such as THE FOURTH DIMENSION. He composed Journals 1990-2014 over twenty-five years.

Rucker describes his process this way: I turn to my journals when I’m undergoing a personal crisis—I find it calming to write what’s on my mind. And I’m always looking for an easy path to enlightenment…I like to describe the things that I see going on in the daily world around me. I’ve always enjoyed Jack Kerouac’s practice of using words to sketch a scene around me in real time.

In this episode you’ll hear Richard Sandling as he describes doing stand up at a science fiction convention, a ukelele cover of the Star Trek theme, Rudy Rucker describing his novel Soft Ware, and Paradise 3001’s Mondo 2000.

Zero Squared #26: Romeo and Juliet in Palestine

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Tom Sperlinger is the guest this week and we discuss his book Romeo and Juliet in Palestine. Tom Sperlinger is director of Lifelong Learning for English at the University of Bristol, where he has set up a part-time BA in English Literature and Community Engagement. He has written about literature, universities and adult education for publications including The Guardian, The Independent on Sunday, The Times Higher, The Times Literary Supplement, Open Democracy and The Reader. Romeo and Juliet in Palestine is his first book and came out from Zero Books last month on June 26th.

John Berger who is best known for his book and television series Ways of Seeing blurbed the book this way:

A book of vivid first-hand experience about the daily lives, suffering and courage of Palestinians living in the West Bank. Read it, imagine it and pass it around.

The voices you’ll hear in this episode include Rick Roderick, Stephen Greenblatt, Hamlet, Horatio, Robin Williams in the Dead Poet’s Society, Michael Fassbender, a Librivox recording of David Cooperfield, and Gretrude Stein reading If I Had Told Him a Completed Portrait of Picasso. The music in the episode is The Carmans Whistle by William Byrd.