Zero Squared #15: Twerking to Turking (EDA)

Alfie Bown is the guest this week and we discuss the book from the EDA Collective Twerking to Turking which is coming from Zero Books this month. With the tag line: “Analysing the signs of everyday life” this is the second collection by the EDA. It is a follow-up to their book “Why Animals are funny.”

Jamie Mackay, writing for Review 31, praised the EDA, writing:

It is not often that theory is this fun to read, and less often still that satire is so well versed in the language of its assailants.

It’s Wednesday, April 15th, 2015 and I’m Douglas Lain the publisher of Zero Books and the host of this podcast.

In this episode you’ll hear a longish clip from Radiolab on the subject of Yellow Rain. The podcast was originally aired on September 24th, 2012, and I’ll provide links to it in the show notes. If you go to the site you’ll find an apology from Robert Krulwich wherein he apologizes for the way he aggressively questioned the Mr Eng Yang regarding reports that “yellow rain” was used on people in Laos after American forces left Vietnam. I want to make clear that, in my opinion, Robert Krulwich should not have apologized. If the oppressed of the Earth are going to find a voice that matters they will, simultaneously, have to be open to the truth and to pursuing the truth. This will require transcending their own experiences even as they act in their own collective interest.

You’ll also hear clips of Philip Glass’s Photographer, an excerpt from a documentary about Audrey Hepburn entitled “World’s Most Photographed Woman,” the comedian Godfrey Chi, Phlearn Photoshop’s “The Basics of Studium and Punctum in Photographs,” and “Got a Good Thing Going” by the Beetletown Players and Mister Show.

Diet Soap Podcast #201: Roderick and the Political Unconscious

The guest this week is professor and philosopher Noelle McAfee and we discuss her friendship with the late Rick Roderick and her book Democracy and the Political Unconscious.

There were no new donations this week and if you’d like to correct that you can find the paypal buttons at dietsoap.podomatic.com. I should also tell you to follow me on Twitter, facebook, linkedin, netlog (does anybody understand what that is?), stumbleupon, and google plus. My email is douglain at gmail dot com. You should read my blog at douglaslain.com, look for the Diet Soap facebook page, and buy all of my books on Amazon.com.

You’ll hear a lot of clips of Rick Roderick in this episode as well as music from the Art of Noise, the theme from the motion picture The Candyman, Charles Ives 3 Quarter Tone Pieces, and Luc Ferrari’s Societe II.

Diet Soap Podcast Rerun: The Dialectical Imagination

The Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School is the subject of discussion with guest professor Martin Jay in this philosophy podcast. Professor Martin Jay is the author of The Dialectical Imagination, and this book written in 1968 was a philosophical history outlining the critical theories of the Frankfurt School philosophers. This is a repeat of episode #93. The conversation especially focuses on the ideas of Theodor Adorno. The music in this episode includes clips from the 1910 Fruitgum Factory’s Simon SaysSchoenberg’s String Quartet No 2, the Icelandic band Mum’s composition They Made Frogs Smoke Until They Exploded, and Theodor Adorno’s Streichquartet. Also featured is Miriam’s Titanic Factoid.

Here’s an excerpt from Adorno’s “The Culture Industry:Enlightenment as Mass Deception”

THE sociological theory that the loss of the support of objectively established religion, the dissolution of the last remnants of pre-capitalism, together with technological and social differentiation or specialisation, have led to cultural chaos is disproved every day; for culture now impresses the same stamp on everything.

Films, radio and magazines make up a system which is uniform as a whole and in every part. Even the aesthetic activities of political opposites are one in their enthusiastic obedience to the rhythm of the iron system. The decorative industrial management buildings and exhibition centers in authoritarian countries are much the same as anywhere else. The huge gleaming towers that shoot up everywhere are outward signs of the ingenious planning of international concerns, toward which the unleashed entrepreneurial system (whose monuments are a mass of gloomy houses and business premises in grimy, spiritless cities) was already hastening. Even now the older houses just outside the concrete city centres look like slums, and the new bungalows on the outskirts are at one with the flimsy structures of world fairs in their praise of technical progress and their built-in demand to be discarded after a short while like empty food cans.