Soap Zero 2: Enlightenment Interrupted

German Idealism and the Enlightenment are the subjects this week as Michael Steinberg discuss his book “Enlightenment Interrupted.” Steinberg is an independent scholar and practicing attorney with a PhD in intellectual history from the University of Rochester. His book “Enlightenment Interrupted (The Lost Moment of German Idealism and the Reactionary Present)” came out from Zero Books in July of this year.

Previous books from Mr. Steinberg include The Fiction of a Thinkable World and A New Biology of Religion.

Professor Andrew Nash at the University of Cape Town praised the book. He wrote, “Michael Steinberg’s “Enlightenment Interrupted” is a master class and a rollercoaster ride, all at once. The pitfalls of abstract individualism have been pointed out since Hegel, and explaining them has been central to radical political thought for fifty years by now. But it’s never been easy to grasp concretely how that separation of self and world came about, and what the alternative to it could have been.”

Diet Soap Podcast #215: Columbo and Confession

Peter Falk’s Columbo is the subject this week and Steven A. Michalkow returns. Steven is an editor at Former People and a podcaster in his own right as the Former People film podcast continues.

On the subject of Columbo and psychoanalysis Slavoj Zizek wrote: In the TV-series Columbo, the crime (the act of murder) is shown in detail in advance, so that the enigma to be resolved is not that of “whodunit?”, but of how the detective will establish the link between the deceitful surface (the “manifest content” of the crime scene) and the truth about the crime (its “latent thought”), how he will prove to the culprit his or her guilt. The success of Columbo thus attests to the fact that the true source of interest in the detective’s work, is the process of deciphering itself, not its result (the triumphant final revelation “And the murderer is…” is completely lacking here, since we know this from the very outset).

It’s Saturday, July 12th, 2014, and I’m Douglas Lain the host of this podcast.

I’d like to urge regular listeners to the Diet Soap podcast to find the paypal buttons at dietsoap.podomatic.com. Also, the podcast is also available via iTunes and I urge people who enjoy this show to consider leaving a review at iTunes in lieu of a donation.

Double Feature Review #2: Dredding Red Dawn

Red Dawn 2012 and Dredd are the two films for this month’s Double Feature Review podcast with Jim Farris and Douglas Lain. It’s landing here, on the Diet Soap podcast feed, but will also be getting its own RSS feed this week. Again, Jim Farris is a grumpy old man with a history in Hollywood whose knowledge of movies and movie history is extensive and Douglas Lain is this guy Jim knows.

A quick Synopsis: Doug enjoyed Dredd a bit more than Jim did while both lamented the existence of Red Dawn. Some topics discussed include Gilles Deleuze’s notion of affective filmmaking and the noble history of product placement in cinema.

From Red Dawn:

Matt Eckert: We’re not doing too bad for a bunch of kids. We’re gonna fight, and we’re gonna keep fighting, because it’s easier now. And we’re used to it. The rest of you are going to have a tougher choice. Because we’re not going to sell it to you. It’s too ugly for that. But when you’re fighting in your own backyard, when you’re fighting for your family, it all hurts a little less, and makes a little more sense. Because for them, this is just a place. But for us, this is our home.
Prisoners: [repeatedly chanting in open rebellion against guards before liberation] Wolverines!

Former People Movie Podcast #1: Solaris

A Co-production from Diet Soap and Former People: A Journal of Bangs and Whimpers this film podcast will focus on both contemporary and canonical films in an attempt to explore the development of film aesthetics. Our first episode focuses on Tarkovsky’s Solaris and the intersection of science fiction and religion.

To put the conversation into context at the outset here is a quote from Andrei Tarkovsky:

The artist is always the servant, and is perpetually trying to pay for the gift that has been given to him as if by a miracle. Modern man, however, does not want to make any sacrifice, even though true affirmation of the self can only be expressed in sacrifice. We are gradually forgetting about this, and at the same time, inevitably, losing all sense of human calling.