Double Feature Review #2: Dredding Red Dawn

Red Dawn 2012 and Dredd are the two films for this month’s Double Feature Review podcast with Jim Farris and Douglas Lain. It’s landing here, on the Diet Soap podcast feed, but will also be getting its own RSS feed this week. Again, Jim Farris is a grumpy old man with a history in Hollywood whose knowledge of movies and movie history is extensive and Douglas Lain is this guy Jim knows.

A quick Synopsis: Doug enjoyed Dredd a bit more than Jim did while both lamented the existence of Red Dawn. Some topics discussed include Gilles Deleuze’s notion of affective filmmaking and the noble history of product placement in cinema.

From Red Dawn:

Matt Eckert: We’re not doing too bad for a bunch of kids. We’re gonna fight, and we’re gonna keep fighting, because it’s easier now. And we’re used to it. The rest of you are going to have a tougher choice. Because we’re not going to sell it to you. It’s too ugly for that. But when you’re fighting in your own backyard, when you’re fighting for your family, it all hurts a little less, and makes a little more sense. Because for them, this is just a place. But for us, this is our home.
Prisoners: [repeatedly chanting in open rebellion against guards before liberation] Wolverines!

Double Feature #1: Cloverfield and Planet of the Apes

The Double Feature podcast with Jim Farris and Douglas Lain is landing here, on the Diet Soap podcast feed, until it finds it’s own home. This is a bit different from the Former People podcast in so much as it isn’t as high brow and will take a look at more B pictures and middle brow fare. It is also different in so much as Jim Farris is a grumpy old man with a history in Hollywood whose knowledge of movies and movie history is extensive rather than a poet or an aesthete or something else grand like that.

The films reviewed in this first podcast are Franklin J. Schaffner’s “Planet of the Apes,” and JJ Abram’s “Cloverfield.”

On Cloverfield Farris believes that the film comments on 9/11 in the way Godzilla commented on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, whereas I believe the film fails to comment on anything but affirms our cultural narcissism through its single camera perspective.

Both of us enjoyed Planet of the Apes quite a lot, especially Heston’s performance. Cut from this episode is a discussion of the character Nova because Douglas liked this character too much and it made everybody sick to their stomach to listen to him talk about her.