Zero Squared #106: Contrary Points on Identity

Nick is the genderqueer self-described mangirl/degenerate PhD dropout behind the smart and funny Youtube channel Contrapoints. Nick is also the guest on this week’s podcast.

This is part one of a two part conversation. If you’d like to hear the second half think about joining the Zero Books Club. Zero Books Club members receive access to a Saturday podcast entitled Inside Zero Books which sometimes features the second half of conversations from the Zero Squared podcast, sometimes features conversations with Zero Books readers about the state of the left, and sometimes features public lectures from Zero Books authors or staff. Zero Books members are also invited to participate in youtube workshops with Zero Books authors and others.

You might also stop by the Zero Books website and purchase a book on critical theory. Recommended titles include Uncertain Futures, Alfie Bown’s interview with Srecko Horvat, and the late Mark Fisher’s Capitalist Realism.

In this episode you’ll hear The Struts covering David Bowie’s hit Rebel Rebel, some controversial statements on transgender politics from Slavoj Zizek, and a sped up clip of Justin Bieber’s Love Me. Right now you’re listening to an instrumental cover of the Kinks hit Lola, but in just a moment you’ll be listening to Nick and I discuss Contrary points on identity.

Zero Squared #80: Porn Panic

Jerry Barnett is an author, technologist, campaigner, photographer and entrepreneur. With a long background in anti-fascism campaigning, he has become increasingly disillusioned with the new left, which has taken on many of the attitudes and methods of the old right. His book Porn Panic is out from Zero Books this month.

In this episode you’ll also hear a collage partially lifted from Stephen Naish’s recent youtube book trailer for his upcoming book Bringing Up Baby. You’ll also hear some pornographic music from the 70s, an excerpt of Kate Brooks debating against the proposition that free speech includes the right to offend, and Tony Babino’s lounge club cover of The Internationale, and a clip from Sexopolis by Jean Pierre Mirouze.

Zero Squared #3: Sweetening the Pill

The guest this week is Holly Grigg-Spall. Grigg-Spall is a women’s health activist and the publication of her book “Sweetening the Pill” has made many, many, many people angry. Going against the common wisdom she argues that the pill is overprescribed and even dangerous to women’s mental health.

Music this week includes the work of Nik Walton. Nik is a contemporary composer from Portland, Oregon, a student of Tomas Svoboda, and a friend of mine. Nik is working composing theme music for this podcast and will be a regular contributor musically along with Dan Lett. You’ll also hear a harmonica version of Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines from the you tuber MisterFinkMusic, clips from the 1979 sex education film Am I Normal, clips from an interview with the 20th century birth control activist Margaret Sanger, and Dan Lett’s musical doodle Green Sharpie.

Jasun Horsley appears for his usual liminalist rant, this time on the subject of Angelina Jolie’s mastectomy.

Former People Film Podcast: Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

Co-produced by Diet Soap, the Former People film podcast is a discussion series. In this episode, we debate Chantal Akerman’s 1975 masterpiece Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles. Is it a Feminist propaganda film, an exploration of obsessive compulsive disorder, or a hidden camera documentary about your mother? Actually it’s a three hour difficulty, a revered housework movie, and an antidote to all the “prostitute with a heart of gold” Hollywood spectaculars you’ve ever seen. Jeanne Dielman will make you suffer.

It is physical, but you know, when I started to shoot Jeanne Dielman, at the beginning, I was not aware of what was going to be the film. Everything was written in the script already, but still. After three or four days, when I saw the first dailies, I realized and I said, “My God, the film is going to be three hours and 20 or 40 minutes long, and it’s going to be developing little by little.” -Chantal Akerman