Double Feature Review #2: Dredding Red Dawn

Red Dawn 2012 and Dredd are the two films for this month’s Double Feature Review podcast with Jim Farris and Douglas Lain. It’s landing here, on the Diet Soap podcast feed, but will also be getting its own RSS feed this week. Again, Jim Farris is a grumpy old man with a history in Hollywood whose knowledge of movies and movie history is extensive and Douglas Lain is this guy Jim knows.

A quick Synopsis: Doug enjoyed Dredd a bit more than Jim did while both lamented the existence of Red Dawn. Some topics discussed include Gilles Deleuze’s notion of affective filmmaking and the noble history of product placement in cinema.

From Red Dawn:

Matt Eckert: We’re not doing too bad for a bunch of kids. We’re gonna fight, and we’re gonna keep fighting, because it’s easier now. And we’re used to it. The rest of you are going to have a tougher choice. Because we’re not going to sell it to you. It’s too ugly for that. But when you’re fighting in your own backyard, when you’re fighting for your family, it all hurts a little less, and makes a little more sense. Because for them, this is just a place. But for us, this is our home.
Prisoners: [repeatedly chanting in open rebellion against guards before liberation] Wolverines!

Former People Film Podcast: Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

Co-produced by Diet Soap, the Former People film podcast is a discussion series. In this episode, we debate Chantal Akerman’s 1975 masterpiece Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles. Is it a Feminist propaganda film, an exploration of obsessive compulsive disorder, or a hidden camera documentary about your mother? Actually it’s a three hour difficulty, a revered housework movie, and an antidote to all the “prostitute with a heart of gold” Hollywood spectaculars you’ve ever seen. Jeanne Dielman will make you suffer.

It is physical, but you know, when I started to shoot Jeanne Dielman, at the beginning, I was not aware of what was going to be the film. Everything was written in the script already, but still. After three or four days, when I saw the first dailies, I realized and I said, “My God, the film is going to be three hours and 20 or 40 minutes long, and it’s going to be developing little by little.” -Chantal Akerman