Zero Squared #29: Shooting the Moon

Brian Willems is Assistant Professor at the University of Split, Croatia, where he teaches literature at the Faculty of Philosophy and film theory at the Arts Academy and his book Shooting the Moon was published in May this year from Zero Books.

Laurence A Rickels, author of Germany: A Science Fiction, blurbed the book this way

Shooting the Moon shows how our most abiding object or objective on reality’s horizon was overshot and displaced by the other reality of realization of our wish fantasies. When we ask for the moon we travel a jump cut from an idealized past to a future of wish fulfillment lying deep inside the film medium and its ongoing history.

In this episode you’ll hear a clip from Futurama, Slavoj Zizek explaining a bottle of tea, Chris “Isto” White singing the jazz standard “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” The Evolution Control Committee’s “The Fucking Moon,” a clip from the auralgraphic entertainment “Dreamies” by Bill Holt, Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner performing in “The First Men in the Moon,” Doctor Who and the Monolith reversing the polarity of the neutron flow, Negativland, and in tribute to Don Joyce, one of “Crosley Bendix’s” Arts Reviews.

Double Feature Funpack #3: Deep Philosophical Movies

The Double Feature Funpack finally returns. Jim Farris is forced to consider philosophical movies but refuses to discuss the greats of the genre. Douglas Lain is forced to listen to Jim blather on as we turn to the internet, specifically to the website Taste in Cinema, to provide us with a list of the 18 Best Philosophical Movies.The movies considered include Hitchcock’s Rope, Linklater’s Waking Life, Christopher Nolan’s Memento, and many others.
Also included in this podcast are clips from the Drop Dead Fred, Heaven can Wait, and Mister Belvedere.

Double Feature Review Reboot: Bobby Thunder

Jim Farris returns with a groan of complaint and we discuss the movies Bobby Deerfield and Thunder Alley. Al Pachino and Fabian are the two leading men in these two race car movies and Jim and I enjoy trashing them both. Annette Funicello is also mentioned and yet we go the entire podcast without singing the Mickey Mouse Club theme. How did that happen?

Here’s a synopsis of the two movies as lifted from Wikipedia.

Thunder Alley is a 1967 film about auto racing, directed by Richard Rush and starring Annette Funicello and Fabian Forte. It was released by American International Pictures.

Bobby Deerfield is a 1977 American romantic drama film directed by Sidney Pollack and starring Al Pacino and Marthe Keller. Loosely based on the 1961 novel Heaven Has No Favorites by Erich Maria Remarque, the film is about a famous American race car driver on the European circuit who falls in love with an enigmatic Swiss woman who is terminally ill. For his performance in the film, Al Pacino was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Actor.

Double Feature Review #2: Dredding Red Dawn

Red Dawn 2012 and Dredd are the two films for this month’s Double Feature Review podcast with Jim Farris and Douglas Lain. It’s landing here, on the Diet Soap podcast feed, but will also be getting its own RSS feed this week. Again, Jim Farris is a grumpy old man with a history in Hollywood whose knowledge of movies and movie history is extensive and Douglas Lain is this guy Jim knows.

A quick Synopsis: Doug enjoyed Dredd a bit more than Jim did while both lamented the existence of Red Dawn. Some topics discussed include Gilles Deleuze’s notion of affective filmmaking and the noble history of product placement in cinema.

From Red Dawn:

Matt Eckert: We’re not doing too bad for a bunch of kids. We’re gonna fight, and we’re gonna keep fighting, because it’s easier now. And we’re used to it. The rest of you are going to have a tougher choice. Because we’re not going to sell it to you. It’s too ugly for that. But when you’re fighting in your own backyard, when you’re fighting for your family, it all hurts a little less, and makes a little more sense. Because for them, this is just a place. But for us, this is our home.
Prisoners: [repeatedly chanting in open rebellion against guards before liberation] Wolverines!