Zero Squared #122: Lacan’s Television

Vakhtang Gomelauri is a therapist and self-proclaimed psychoanalyst working in NYC who is influenced by the ideas of the Jacques Lacan and this week he’s stopped by to discuss the book Television by Jacques Lacan, and the televised broadcast that the book is based on.

If you’re looking for a book to help you understand psychology and its crisis you should pick up a copy of The Off Modern by Ron Roberts. Other Zero Books titles worth having would be Anselm Jappe’s The Writing on the Wall which is a collection that brings an understanding of Marx’s Value Theory to bear on political questions, and, of course, Angela Nagle’s Kill All Normies which is turning out to be a great conversation piece. It’s guaranteed to transform any leftist get together into a struggle session.

If you enjoy this podcast consider joining the Zero Books Club. Zero Books Club members receive access to a Saturday podcast entitled Inside Zero Books which sometimes features the second half of conversations with Zero Squared guests and sometimes features conversations with Zero Books readers about the state of the left. Zero Books Club members are also invited to participate in youtube workshops with Zero Books authors and others.

Zero Squared #9: Magic Tricks and the Big Other

Peter Rollins is the guest this week and we discuss his book The Divine Magician: The Disappearance of Religion and the Discovery of Faith which came out from Howard Books, an imprint of Simon and Schuster, in January of this year (2015). Rob Bell, the author of Velvet Elvis, blurbed the book this way: What Pete does in this book is take you to the edge of a cliff where you can see how high you are and how far you would fall if you lost your footing. And just when most writers would kindly pull you back from the edge, he pushes you off, and you find yourself without any solid footing, disoriented, and in a bit of a panic…until you realize that your fall is in fact, a form of flying. And it’s thrilling.

The two new titles from Zero Books this month are Rebel Rebel by Chris O’Leary and No More Heroes by Carl Neville. Chris O’Leary will be on the podcast in two weeks to discuss that Space Oddity who is known as David Bowie and there is also going to be a contest at davidbowienews.com. I’ll let you know about that and how you might win a free copy of the book in the weeks to come.

I want to mention the passing of Leonard Nimoy. As some of you might know I’ve been working on a book about Star Trek and Hegel’s approach to the dialectic for a couple of years now, or more accurately I’ve not been working on it. The original title of that book was “Star Trek is the true religion.” I’m saddened by the passing of Leonard Nimoy. I feel similarly to how I felt when Johnny Carson died, only more so. In a way the death of Leonard Nimoy is like the death of Ronald McDonald. It feels like something that wasn’t supposed to happen.

In this episode you’ll be hearing from a youtube magician, a clip from the David Fincher movie The Game, from the Woody Allen movie The Purple Rose of Cairo, from a lecture by the death of God theologian Thomas Altizer, from Late Nite from David Letterman, and from the album Mister Spock’s Music from Outer Space, but in just a moment you’ll be hearing Peter Rollins and I discuss Magic Tricks and The Big Other.

Diet Soap Podcast #217: What’s missing from psychoanalysis?

Psychoanalysis and Lacan are the subjects this week and Joshua Cohen is the guest. We specifically discuss the object relation theory of the psychoanalyst Melanie Klein and the knotty theories of Jacque Lacan. Psychoanalytic terms such as splitting, psychic destitution, and the big Other are tossed around as Joshua Cohen is a therapist working in Seattle with training in Kleinian therapeutic techniques, and an interest in Lacan.

I’d like to urge regular listeners to the Diet Soap podcast to find the paypal buttons at dietsoap.podomatic.com. Also, the podcast is available via iTunes and I urge people who enjoy this show to consider leaving a review of at iTunes in lieu of a donation.

The music is this episode includesMozart’s The Marriage of Figaro (a work Freud claimed to enjoy despite being, in his own words, “completely unmusical”) as performed by Babette Dorn. Also included are clips of Zizek discussing coffee and cream, Annette Hanshaw singing “You’re the Cream in my Coffee,” a clip from The History of Philosophy without any Gaps, Louis CK on Parmenides and Parenting, and Mister Rogers autotuned.