Zero Squared #149: Video Games are Right Wing?

Alfie Bown is the author of The Playstation Dreamworld, a philosophy of games and politics and Enjoying It: Candy Crush and Capitalism. Along with being a theorist on video game culture, he has recently started writing for the Guardian. He recently wrote a review of Ready Player One entitled “Steven Spielberg’s film portrays video gamers at their worst” and before that he wrote a think piece for them entitled “How video games are fuelling the rise of the far right.” It’s this second piece that he’ll be discussing in this week’s episode.

Matthew McKeever’s thought experiment novella entitled Coming From Nothing is available for pre-order from Zero Books. Coming From Nothing is a tragi-comic love story concerned with notions of identity, such as Judith Butler’s idea that sexual identity isn’t determined by the body, and John Locke’s that personal identity is a question of memory. ~ Josh Dever, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin has called McKeever’s book “ a literary beignet sweetened by a rich powdering of philosophical speculation.”

I want to thank David F, Nicholas M, Bo D, and 253 other Patrons of the Inside Zero Books podcast. You are making Zero Books’ digital content production possible.

If you enjoy the podcast you might consider becoming a patron too. You’ll get access to a second podcast every week including monthly installments of C Derick Varn’s podcasts Symptomatic Redness and Alternatives.

Zero Squared #28: Imaginary Games

Chris Bateman is a game designer, outsider philosopher and author. His book Imaginary Games was published by Zero Books in 2011. Bateman is also the blogger behind Only a Game and he posts regularly in between writing how to manuals on game design and lecturing at the University of Bolton.

Jon Cogburn, Director of Philosophy at LSU blurbed Imaginary Games this way:

Chris Bateman’s Imaginary Games may just do for videogames what Noël Carroll’s The Philosophy of Horror did for scary books and movies…. not only philosophically compelling and interesting; it is also a great read.

In this episode you’ll hear a rerun of a conversation about the movie Tron between me and my then thirteen year old son Ben, theme music from Super Smash Brothers Melee, Chad African explaining Zizek and his idea of ontological incompleteness, clips from a youtube documentary about smash, a short clip on Hegel from the 8-bit philosophy series, and the theme music from Super Mario Brothers.